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26 May 2021
Tags: News

Meet Isobel Marshall & Eloise Hall – new Women’s Health Week joint ambassadors

Jean Hailes for Women’s Health is delighted to introduce our first ever joint ambassadors for Women’s Health Week, Isobel Marshall and Eloise Hall.

Co-founders of TABOO, a social enterprise business selling their own brand of organic sanitary products, Isobel and Eloise are committed to breaking down menstrual stigma and ending period poverty.

Their business idea turned into a passion when the then-teenagers discovered that 30% of girls in developing countries will drop out of school once they start having periods due to a lack of access to appropriate menstrual health care and education.

A successful crowdfunding campaign in 2018 enabled the young entrepreneurs to pay for their first order of TABOO sanitary products. Now, 100% of net profits go to support education programs for girls and women in Sierra Leone and Uganda. TABOO also facilitates the donation of pads and tampons to disadvantaged women in Australia.

In recognition of her work, Isobel was named the 2021 Young Australian of the Year.

“I am passionate about the role that health plays in ensuring women are able to work, live and enjoy life to their full potential, with the care and understanding of their body that they deserve,” says Isobel. “As is the case when addressing period poverty, advocating for women's health starts with sparking conversations and sharing our own experiences.

“That's what Women’s Health Week is all about and I am excited to be part of it and see the change it will bring.”

Eloise Hall shares her TABOO co-founder’s passion. “Choosing to be a Women’s Health Week ambassador was such an exciting decision for me,” says Eloise. “Women's health is a topic that's constantly avoided and misunderstood and it's about time that narrative changed.

“Periods are the reason we exist as a human race, but are also an experience that stops many girls attending school due to poor menstrual support systems.”

Jean Hailes for Women’s Health is also talking periods during this Women’s Health Week – from 6-10 September – with a day dedicated to the topic. Join us as we discuss issues including: how periods are different from woman to woman; when periods aren’t normal; changes in periods from puberty to menopause, and; cultural taboos and stigma. Sign up now to get the free daily emails during Women’s Health Week.

For more information on Jean Hailes or Women’s Health Week please contact Caroline Cottrill on 0438 257 246 or email [email protected].